wobbufetts:

aidn:

how the hell do i talk to people

Stand in front of them and press A

If you were thinking of asking me what’s wrong, the answer is North Carolina. It’s always North Carolina. I hate driving every day, every where, I wish I had some actual friends here, this is a professional backwater, and I literally cry sometimes when I get invited to cover events back in NYC. I regret moving here on a pretty regular basis.

That’s why I was sad yesterday, it’s why I will be sad tomorrow, and, for the foreseeable future, the answer what’s upsetting me is North Carolina.

luckysipe:

thatmeggirl:

Familiar NatGeo titles! With @luckysipe

One of those game represented a stressful 9 month period of my life. I was, however, very proud of the game. This is also when Meg and I met, years before we would start to date. 

ROMANCE!

luckysipe:

thatmeggirl:

Familiar NatGeo titles! With @luckysipe

One of those game represented a stressful 9 month period of my life. I was, however, very proud of the game. This is also when Meg and I met, years before we would start to date. 

ROMANCE!

luckysipe:

Action Figure Fury: In your Boing Boing article, ” How to Get a Figurine Produced in China and Not Lose Your Shirt “, you speak about the questionable results of online advertising and the need for social media for promotion. What have you found to be the most successful channels to talk about your Golden Age Line?
Jared Zichek: The best channel is the direct email newsletter, though it can take a long time to build up a good list of customers. Getting your press release featured on a major site can bring in a lot of new blood, but you’re lucky if they publish it. With Facebook, your posts are “throttled” unless you pay to have them reach more of your followers, and I refuse to give them my money. They already make money off my personal data and that’s enough.
Revisiting the Golden Age with Jared Zichek | Interview
I speak with Jared Zichek of Golden Age Comics Figurines about Golden Age comics and marketing and producing toys and collectibles.

luckysipe:

Action Figure Fury: In your Boing Boing article, ” How to Get a Figurine Produced in China and Not Lose Your Shirt “, you speak about the questionable results of online advertising and the need for social media for promotion. What have you found to be the most successful channels to talk about your Golden Age Line?

Jared Zichek: The best channel is the direct email newsletter, though it can take a long time to build up a good list of customers. Getting your press release featured on a major site can bring in a lot of new blood, but you’re lucky if they publish it. With Facebook, your posts are “throttled” unless you pay to have them reach more of your followers, and I refuse to give them my money. They already make money off my personal data and that’s enough.

Revisiting the Golden Age with Jared Zichek | Interview

I speak with Jared Zichek of Golden Age Comics Figurines about Golden Age comics and marketing and producing toys and collectibles.

Checkpoint:: Call For Submissions

Checkpoint: Reflections on Gaming, Travel and Place

I’m seeking contributing writers for an upcoming collection of essays, vignettes and general reflections on games and location. Send .doc or .docx submissions to Checkpoint.Submissions@gmail.com to contribute.

I’m unsure whether I’m a travel writer who loves games, or a games journalist who loves to travel. Either way, I’m pretty happy with my DS and a train ticket in my purse.

I see many connections between games and physical location, and I hope you do too.  Do you think of Monkey Island when you visit a real jungle? Did you recognize your favorite Beijing dumpling shop in the background of a hidden object game? Will you always remember which game you played that week you were snowbound in New England? Or the game you played on a long flight? Did a game inspire you to take an actual trip? Did a trip encourage you to try a new game?

I’m looking for around 20 brilliant writers to share personal reflections on games, place and travel. Ideal contributors will have a background in game development, games journalism, travel writing, or just in thoughtful analysis of games.

Tentative release date is Spring 2015.

How long should my submission be?

1K-3K words. About. I mean, it’s done when it’s done, but a paragraph or a novella isn’t right for this collection.

Are reprints ok?

Reworked blog posts are awesome, but please let me know if the piece has appeared elsewhere.

Does this pay actual money?

$25 for an accepted essay, plus a contributor copy when the book is released. If your piece is accepted, you promise not to post it in it’s entirety until 2 months after the book is released.

When is the deadline? When will you notify me?

Please submit before the end of November 2014. If your piece is accepted, you will be notified by Jan 1, 2015. Tentative release date is Spring 2015, because like any good game developer, I expect delays to crop up.

Send .doc or .docx submissions to Checkpoint.Submissions@gmail.com

(Source: simpsonsparadox.com)

di-johnlock:

It’s not over, don’t forget

di-johnlock:

It’s not over, don’t forget

(Source: seven-percent-solvtion)

Bik Review on Hardcore Droid

Bik_CampScene-1024x576

My new review is up, over on Hardcore Droid:

Bik is a point-and-click (er, tap) adventure, offering all the best of the point-and-click genre: There are piles of bizarre items to be picked up and then used in unusual ways, loveable loser characters in the tradition of Guybrush Threepwood and Roger Wilco, snarky flavortext, bizarre ways to get yourself killed, and a twisted, dramatic adventure plot.

Like the old Sierra games, it’s quite easy to experiment and get yourself killed in Bik, but the game keeps from being too punishing by autosaving right before performing an action that might lead to certain death. As I played, I grew quite frightened of seeing the autosave screen…

Knowing that Bik will autosave before character death does encourage players to try ridiculous actions, as well as to try firing Ammet’s blaster at random objects. Some scenes still needed to be repeated, either due to bad luck (avoiding the random approach of an alien sensor, for example) or because it took me several times to figure out my objective. Repeating scenes doesn’t feel like punishment or filler, but it doesn’t feel like great game design, either.

Via Bik—A Space Adventure Review | Hardcore Droid.

Bik Review on Hardcore Droid from Simpson’s Paradox

The post Bik Review on Hardcore Droid appeared first on Simpson’s Paradox.

At #comfort with @luckysipe

At #comfort with @luckysipe

skywritingg:

bride-of-bucky:

pixiepienix:

mahou-mofo:

"Please stop selling shirts carelessly" wtf are they supposed to interview the people buying them like what does this dude want

you KNOW if he saw a dude wearing it he would not have said anything, he’d assume the guy knew the music, because this is not about music snobbery it’s about men thinking women are fucking idiots, and behaviour like this REINFORCES that belief because this guy will harass and belittle women, finding them to be “wrong” but he will leave men alone ASSUMING that they are “right” thereby providing himself with skewed inaccurate evidence to prove that women are idiots, completing the vicious cycle of misogyny that so many men perpetuate daily but are COMPLETELY FUCKING BLIND TO

My favorite part about gatekeeper dudes talking to me when I wear my Misfits shirt is telling them I only like post-Danzig Misfits, an answer I should really just change to “Who? I just like sweet-ass skulls.”

Though I guess I’d be pretty insecure if I were like 4 feet tall too

I have to be honest, I always assume people wearing Misfits shirts don’t actually listen to them. Because they’re really cool shirts. And, like, why does anyone care so much? I think I just got really worn out on the whole idea of “posers” and shit in like junior high and I’ve been over it ever since.

I’m imagining a world in which the mall cashier investigates a shopper’s knowledge of the band (or game… anime… any other type of fandom) and refuses to make a sale if they determine the buyer isn’t a dedicated enough fan. That’ll keep people who just enjoy the art that the band commissioned from being able to give the band any of their unworthy money! Keeping income away from your idols, THAT’S HOW TO SHOW YOU’RE A TRUE FAN! 

Hot Topic would probably have to pay their cashiers more for that service, though. 

(Source: shutitkyle)